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Tarot Decks

Below each descriptive paragraph there are small samplings of each deck. For the sake of comparison, these selections include the following cards: The Chariot, The Devil, The World, King of Pentacles, Ace of Wands, 3 of Cups, 6 of Swords, and 8 of Pentacles.

Tarot in the Land of Mystereum

Tarot in the Land of Mystereum

by Jordan Hoggard

Tarot of the Masters

Tarot of the Masters by James Ricklef

by James Ricklef


Langustl Tarot

Langustl Tarot by by Stephan Lange

by Stephan Langustl Lange


bifrost Tarot

bifrost Tarot by Jeremy Lampkin

by Jeremy Lampkin


Duncan-Streeter

Duncan-Streeter Tarot by Charles Vick Duncan and Melissa Streeter

by Duncan & Streeter

 

 

The first deck, Tarot in the Land of Mystereum is exactly what the title implies, or actually states – mysterious.  The deck seems to be based mostly on the whims of its artist, Jordan Hoggard’s unconsious thoughts.  Without much of a traditional framework to base its understandings upon, the intention of this deck seems to be to get readers to take a stroll through their own unconsciousness, perhaps in order to become more in tune with their imaginations.  The lack of much traditional structure forces readers to rely on their intuition.  Naturally, using this deck helps readers develop this psychic ability.

 

     
Chariot
Mystereum Chariot
Devil
Mystereum Devil
World
Mystereum World
     
King of Pentacles
Mystereum Pentacles King
Ace of Wands
Mystereum Wands Ace
3 of Cups
Mystereum Cups 3
     
6 of Swords
Mystereum Swords 6
8 of Pentacles
Mystereum Pentacles 8
 

 

 

The second deck, Tarot of the Masters is an interesting twist on the classic Rider-Waite tarot deck.  Artist James Ricklef based this deck on the works of famous old masters of painting, including the likes of Toulouse-Lautrec, Rubens, and Bosch.  He browsed through hundreds of their works in order to find concepts that matched his vision of the Waite-style 78-card tarot deck.  Instead of simply mashing their works together and calling it a day, he took it upon himself to re-draw their visions, giving his deck the sense of both unity and diversity at the same time.

 

     
Chariot
Masters Chariot
Demons
Masters Demons
World
Masters World
     
King of Coins
Masters Coins King
Ace of Wands
Masters Wands Ace
3 of Cups
Masters Cups 3
     
6 of Swords
Masters Swords 6
8 of Coins
Masters Coins 8
 

 

 

 

The Langustl Tarot by Stephan "Langustl" Lange was based on a combination of Aleister Crowley’s Book of Thoth and the Rider-Waite-Smith deck by A. E. Waite.  The Minor Arcana of this deck contain what seem to be traditional pip cards, meaning they are not so much depictions of scenes like RWS-inspired decks, but instead show simple numbered pictures of the suit’s avatars.  On the other hand, the Majors were apparently more inspired by the Rider-Waite.  Langustl’s cards are brilliant, vibrant close-up representations which capture the essence of the core elemental energy of each card of the deck with intense focus.  As extreme close-ups, even the trumps have a pip-like energy about them, and this reveals that the Minors were actually more RWS-inspired than they appear to be.  The unique character of this deck lies in the expressive style which show Lange’s appreciation of the fact that everything in the universe is charaterized by its own unique vibrations.

 

     
Chariot
Langustl Chariot
Devil
Langustl Devil
World
Langustl World
     
King of Coins
Langustl Coins King
Ace of Wands
Langustl Wands Ace
3 of Cups
Langustl Cups 3
     
6 of Swords
Langustl Swords 6
8 of Coins
Langustl Coins 8
 

 

 

The fourth deck, bifrost is similar to Langustl in that it is also a hybrid of Thoth and Rider-Waite influences.  The deck’s artist, Jeremy Lampkin came to realize that he wanted to become an artist only after creating this tarot deck, which was done in honor of the traditions of the old mystery schools of the occult.  After the completion of one of the highest rites of initiation, it is customary to design, or at least to re-draw a tarot deck to be the occultist’s personalized tool of divination (and more), a representation of his own understanding of the universe.  Understanding that everything must have its equal and opposite balance factor (which is often mistaken for hypocracy), Lampkin saw the tarot deck as an holistic opportunity to reunify many seemingly disparate forces.

 

     
Chariot
bifrost Chariot
Devil
bifrost Devil
Universe
bifrost Universe
     
Knight of Disks
bifrost Disks Knight
Ace of Wands
bifrost Wands Ace
3 of Cups
bifrost Cups 3
     
6 of Swords
bifrost Swords 6
8 of Disks
bifrost Disks 8
 

 

 

Warning: Simulated Gore
Duncan-Streeter

The Duncan-Streeter Tarot by Charles Vick Duncan and Melissa Streeter has a vampire theme influenced by a combination of Nosferatu and Vlad the Impaler.  Despite its graphic use of gory scenarios on the Stakes, Swords, and Cups suits, the deck’s message is not about violence, as the card meanings actually do not deviate too far from standard Rider-Waite meanings.  While many tarot decks have been made with vampiric themes, this deck stands apart from the "dark" or "gothic" mood of most vampire decks.  The mood of this deck is more upbeat, more like a gory horror-comedy movie.  Hardcore fans of this genre may like to check out Duncan’s movies, as he is not just an artist who has done over 1000 paintings, but also an upcoming film director.  On the other hand those who do not like vampire, horror, or gore movies should be warned that this deck is not for them.

 

     
Chariot
Duncan-Streeter Chariot
Devil
Duncan-Streeter Devil
World
Duncan-Streeter World
     
King of Pentagrams
Duncan-Streeter Pentagrams King
Ace of Wands
Duncan-Streeter Wands Ace
3 of Cups
Duncan-Streeter Cups 3
     
6 of Swords
Duncan-Streeter Swords 6
8 of Pentagrams
Duncan-Streeter Pentagrams 8
 

 

 

 

 

Tarot in the Land of Mystereum Copyright ©2010 Jordan Hoggard
Tarot of the Masters Copyright ©2008 James Ricklef
Langustl Tarot ©2008 Stephan Lange
bifrost Tarot ©2007 Jeremy Lampkin
Duncan-Streeter Tarot ©2010 Charles Vick Duncan & Melissa Streeter